Pressure Washing in Mount Pleasant, SC

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Tidal South has extensive experience in commercial pressure washing, working closely with property managers and contractors for maintenance and new construction projects. Our crew utilizes top-quality commercial equipment, including:

  • Industrial Pressure Washing Trailers
  • High-Output Pressure Washers
  • Integrated Burners for Hot Water
  • Advanced Chemical Solutions
  • Large Water Tanks for Remote Site Pressure Washing

Our commercial clients take their jobs seriously. They have high standards, and as such, we provide the highest-quality, most efficient pressure washing options to exceed those expectations.

If you're a property manager or business owner looking for relief, your property is in good hands with Tidal South Pressure Washing. Some of the most common pressure washing options we offer to commercial customers include:

  • Apartment Pressure Washing
  • Condominium Pressure Washing
  • Parking Garage Pressure Washing
  • Window Cleaning
  • Shopping Center Pressure Washing
  • Retail Store Pressure Washing
  • Fleet Vehicle Pressure Cleaning

What Client Say About Us

Having served apartment complex owners for years, we step in when you need us the most. Some of our apartment and condo pressure washing services include:

Pressure Washing Mount Pleasant, SC

Concrete Cleaning for Apartment Complexes

Our highly-effective pressure washing services for apartments cleans oil, gum, grease, grime, dirt, and just about everything else. We can also pressure wash your community's sidewalks, driveways, parking lots, and much more.

Pressure Washing Mount Pleasant, SC

Building Cleaning for Apartment Complexes

Our washing methods help remove mildew, mold, dirt, and stains in a safe manner for your buildings and tenants. By cleaning the exterior of your apartment building, you can boost curb appeal, maintain siding quality, and protect your tenants' health.

Pressure Washing Mount Pleasant, SC

Roof Cleaning for Apartment Complexes

We use safe washing tactics to clean the roofs in your apartment community. This process protects your shingles and eliminates those ugly black streaks that ruin your shingles.

The Surprising Benefits of Apartment Complex Pressure Washing

Why let your walkways, parking lots, gutters, and siding accrue dirt, grime, mold, and algae? When residents and guests complain about how dirty their apartment community is, you must act quickly. Tidal South Pressure Washing is here to serve you with streamlined, efficient pressure washing services that keep tenants happy.

Here are just a few surprising benefits of apartment complex pressure washing:

Bring in New Tenants
Bring in New Tenants

If you want to attract new residents to your apartment complex, make a great first impression. One of the best ways to do that is with professional pressure washing. As an owner or landlord, you need to show future residents how beautiful their soon-to-be community is. That's true even if you're not charging a lot for rent. Nobody wants to live in a filthy-looking apartment complex.

Reduce Liability
Reduce Liability

As a property manager or landlord, you must abide by your tenant's rights. You have to provide them with a habitable place to live. As such, you must keep your apartment complex clean and free of health hazards like mildew and mold. To avoid liability and litigious action, include pressure washing from Tidal South on your maintenance checklist.

Increase Apartment Building Lifespan
Increase Apartment Building Lifespan

Even the most well-built apartment buildings will suffer from wear and tear with time. Exposure to the elements, especially in areas with a lot of rain and snow, may cause your complex to degrade. When pollutants fester, it accelerates that degradation. By getting rid of those pollutants with pressure washing, you can extend your property's lifespan.

The Surprising Benefits of Apartment Complex Pressure Washing

Though Tidal South Pressure leads the field in commercial pressure washing, we're also proud to offer premium pressure washing for homeowners too.

As one of the premier home power washing companies in metro SC, we're passionate about restoring the outside appearance of homes. We guarantee your satisfaction by using the highest-quality power washing tools and proven techniques to clean your home. Whether you're trying to sell your house or just need to update its look, we're here to help. Give us a call today to learn more about the Tidal South difference.

Some of the most popular residential pressure washing services we offer include:

Pressure Washing Mount Pleasant, SC

Pressure Washing

Pressure Washing Mount Pleasant, SC

Window Cleaning

Pressure Washing Mount Pleasant, SC

House Washing

Pressure Washing Mount Pleasant, SC

Gutter Cleaning

Pressure Washing Mount Pleasant, SC

Concrete Cleaning

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phone-number 843-696-7637
Pressure Washing Mount Pleasant, SC

Benefits of Pressure Washing Your Home

A lot of homeowners believe they can spray down their home with a hose and get the same effects as pressure washing. While DIY cleaning methods are great for minor issues, residential pressure washing is much more comprehensive and effective. It's about more than removing a little dirt from your siding or your gutters.

Here are a few of the most common benefits homeowners enjoy when they use Tidal South for their pressure washing:

Prevent Property Damage

So you've got mold or moss growing on your home's exteriors. What's the big deal? As it turns out, grime, moss, dirt, and other built-up substances can cause corrosion, running your home's exterior surfaces. When left unaddressed, that corrosion can seep into the materials under your concrete sealant or paint, like the wood on your deck. Substances like dirt also tend to accumulate in the small crevices that every home has. Out of reach of the wind and rain, this type of grime can add up for years until it becomes a bacterial breeding ground. Tidal South's residential pressure washing removes dirt, grime, and mold while hitting those impossible-to-reach crevices that damage your home.


Save Money

When you think about all the damage that pressure washing prevents, it makes sense that you'll be saving money when you hire Tidal South. Having your home pressure washed regularly is usually less expensive than the repairs you'll need to pay for if you were to avoid keeping your property clean.


Prep Renovation Surfaces

As you probably know, you can't paint over a dirty surface. If you're thinking about applying a new coat of paint to your home or even adding a deck or new room, pressure wash first. Pressurized washing helps clean your surfaces and can remove peeling paint and other defects that may affect the surface you're working on.

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Trust Tidal South for All of Your Pressure Washing Needs

Keeping your home or business looking its best is a great feeling. But pressure washing goes beyond aesthetics. It protects your property from unnecessary damage, keeps your family or employees happy and safe, and even saves money, time, and stress.

Remember - a thorough pressure wash isn't an extravagance. It's a necessity. Let the friendly professionals at Tidal South Pressure Washing handle the hard work for you. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, whether you're tending to your home or protecting your business.

Have questions about our process? Contact our office today. We'd be happy to answer your questions and explain how we can solve your pressure washing needs.

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Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Mount Pleasant voters asked to approve property tax increase for parks, recreation

MOUNT PLEASANT — It’s been more than a decade since the town bought more than 120 acres for a future park. Now, voters are being asked to approve a property tax increase to make that park a reality.Most of the $50 million Mount Pleasant would borrow, if the park tax referendum were to pass in a town-wide vote Nov. 8, would be used to develop the site on Rifle Range Road, with an estimated $10 million going to other recreation projects.The town’s property tax would rise by 10 percent to pay off the borrowed mon...

MOUNT PLEASANT — It’s been more than a decade since the town bought more than 120 acres for a future park. Now, voters are being asked to approve a property tax increase to make that park a reality.

Most of the $50 million Mount Pleasant would borrow, if the park tax referendum were to pass in a town-wide vote Nov. 8, would be used to develop the site on Rifle Range Road, with an estimated $10 million going to other recreation projects.

The town’s property tax would rise by 10 percent to pay off the borrowed money plus interest. When the debt is paid off after 15 years the extra tax would end, according to advocates, although the referendum does not mention a time limit.

The impact on total property tax bills would be much smaller than a 10 percent increase because the town accounts for just a portion of those annual bills and the school district gets the largest share.

Most Town Council members — seven of nine — supported putting the referendum on the ballot and some are actively working to see it passed.

“We’re trying to create something for this generation and the next,” Councilman John Iacofano said. “I think it’s going to be tight, but I think it’s going to pass.”

Mayor Will Haynie and Councilwoman Brenda Corley are opposed.

“In bad economic times, not everyone can afford this,” said Haynie. “I’m out there letting people know why they ought to vote no.”

He said the town should rely on impact fees that apply to new home construction to fund growth-related needs for recreation projects. The most those fees could raise would be $1.68 million yearly by Haynie’s estimate and wouldn’t allow the town to borrow tens of millions to put plans in action.

“If the referendum is successful, we can begin building immediately,” Iacofano and Councilwoman G.M. Whitley wrote, urging support for the ballot question.

Plans for the park site include four large playing fields, tennis and pickleball courts, playgrounds, fishing piers, a disc golf course, trails, volleyball and basketball courts, a performance space and a multipurpose building.

“It will be the Central Park of Mount Pleasant,” then-Mayor Billy Swails said in 2010, when the town and county agreed to spend $20 million to buy the land.

Iacofano said that if the town had raised its property tax then, the town would have a park by now.

“I don’t know that people truly understand how inexpensive our taxes are in Mount Pleasant, considering the services received,” he said.

The referendum would put an estimated $40 million toward building the park. The remaining 20 percent of the money would go to renovations of the Park West pool building, improvements at the Mugsy Kerr tennis complex on Whipple Road, and bike/pedestrian trails. If any money is left, the town could use that to fund green space preservation.

So, just how much would taxes increase if the referendum were to pass?

The impact on any particular taxpayer would vary, because the property tax is based on the assessed value of real estate and vehicles. Even next-door homeowners with identical houses could see very different results, depending when they purchased their homes and what vehicles sit in the driveways.

For an owner-occupant with a house valued at $500,000 for tax purposes, passage of the referendum would mean an extra $80, plus the added tax on any vehicles.

If that same house were a rental property, the extra tax would be $120, because commercial properties are taxed at a 50 percent higher rate. Large businesses would see the greatest tax difference.

The last time the town put a recreation referendum on the ballot, in 2015, it was narrowly defeated. The town has planned to develop the park site since it was purchased in 2010, but has not developed a funding plan.

The town’s property is half the 245-acre site that was jointly purchased with Charleston County Parks and Recreation. The town’s portion is planned for more active recreation, with playing fields, pickleball courts and other amenities.

Some people, including Corley, have come to see the town-owned land as green space that should not be developed. In voting against holding a referendum, Corley expressed concern about the impact on wildlife.

Recreation advocates argue that the town has far too few playing fields to handle the current demand, and say most of the jointly owned site would remain undeveloped in any case.

A group called Vote for Parks — Mount Pleasant has put up a website (voteparks.org) advocating for the referendum. There appears to be no organized opposition, but a big hurdle for supporters will be overcoming the history of town voters opposing property tax increases, including the 2015 park referendum and the 2020 Charleston County affordable housing referendum.

Daniel Brownstein, who ran unsuccessfully for a seat in the statehouse against Joe Bustos in 2020, is representing that group. He said it’s being funded by “local citizens who want to ensure that children and adults have adequate parks and recreational amenities.”

Several Tigers make All-ODAC football team

Hampden-Sydney College (H-SC) placed nine student-athletes on the 2022 All-Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC) Football Teams, including four First Team and five Second Team selections, while freshman wide receiver Mason Cunningham of Arlington was picked as the ODAC Rookie of the Year.Earning First Team All-ODAC honors were senior tight end David Byler of Virginia Beach, junior running back Melik Frost of Hardeeville, South Carolina, junior offensive lineman T.J. Minter of Chester and junior defensive back Will ...

Hampden-Sydney College (H-SC) placed nine student-athletes on the 2022 All-Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC) Football Teams, including four First Team and five Second Team selections, while freshman wide receiver Mason Cunningham of Arlington was picked as the ODAC Rookie of the Year.

Earning First Team All-ODAC honors were senior tight end David Byler of Virginia Beach, junior running back Melik Frost of Hardeeville, South Carolina, junior offensive lineman T.J. Minter of Chester and junior defensive back Will Pickren of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.

Garnering Second Team All-ODAC accolades were Cunningham, as an all-purpose back, fifth-year quarterback Tanner Bernard of Lynchburg, sophomore wide receiver Austin Fernandez of Warrenton, fifth-year defensive lineman Michael Harris of Ashland and junior defensive back James-Ryan Salvi of Troutville.

Mason Cunningham started seven of 10 games and had 59 receptions for 660 receiving yards and six touchdowns. He ranks second in the ODAC in receptions and receptions per game (5.9), is tied for fourth in receiving touchdowns, and tied for fifth in receiving yards and receiving yards per game (66.0). Mason averaged 5.4 yards on eight punt returns with a long return of 10 yards.

David Byler started all 10 games and had 49 receptions for 547 receiving yards and six touchdowns. He ranks fourth in the ODAC in receptions (47), tied for fourth in receiving touchdowns, fifth in receptions per game (4.9), and seventh in receiving yards and receiving yards per game (54.7). David established a new season record for receptions by a tight end at H-SC with his 49 receptions, and completed his H-SC career with 59 career receptions for 640 yards and seven touchdowns-starting 12 of 27 career games.

Melik Frost started all 10 games and rushed for 943 yards on 201 carries (4.7) and 12 touchdowns, adding 236 yards receiving on 26 receptions and one receiving touchdown. He leads the ODAC in rushing yards and rushing yards per game (94.3), and ranks second in all-purpose yards (1,179), all-purpose yards per game (117.9), rushing touchdowns and total touchdowns (13).

T.J. Minter started all 10 games, anchoring the offensive line from his left tackle position as the Tigers accounted for 4,275 yards of total offense (427.5), including 1,139 yards rushing (113.9) and 3,136 yards passing (313.6) with 44 touchdowns. Minter is now a two-time All-ODAC First Team selection.

Will Pickren started all 10 games at safety and had 123 total tackles, including 48 solo and 75 assisted, 5.0 tackles for loss, two interceptions, three pass breakups, one forced fumble, one quarterback hurry and one blocked PAT kick. He leads the ODAC in total tackles and tackles per game, and is tied for sixth in interceptions. He ranks third in Division III in total tackles and tackles per game. Will is a now a three-time All-ODAC First Team selection.

Tanner Bernard, a second-year team captain, started all eight games he played and passed for 2,486 yards (204-311, 65.6%) and 21 touchdowns with four interceptions. He leads the ODAC in passing yards per game (310.8), completions per game (25.5) and total offense (310.2), ranks second in passing yards, passing touchdowns, completion percentage (65.6), passing efficiency (152.52) and passing yards per attempt (8.0), and fourth in passing yards per completion (12.2). He ranks fourth in Division III in passing yards per game and completions per game and eighth in total offense. Tanner is now a three-time All-ODAC selection (First Team in 2021), and completed his H-SC career with 5,965 yards passing and 44 touchdowns, adding 84 yards rushing and five touchdowns for 6,049 yards of total offense-starting 23 of 23 career games.

Austin Fernandez started all 10 games and had 60 receptions for 775 receiving yards and six touchdowns. He leads the ODAC in receptions and receptions per game, is third in receiving yards and receiving yards per game (77.5), and is tied for fourth in receiving touchdowns.

Michael Harris, a team captain, started all nine games he played and had 29 total tackles, including 12 solo and 17 assisted, three tackles for loss, one sack, one quarterback hurry and one blocked PAT kick. Michael is a now a two-time All-ODAC selection, and completed his H-SC career with 101 career tackles, including 36 solo and 65 assisted, nine tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks, one quarterback hurry and one blocked PAT kick-starting 29 of 33 career games.

James-Ryan Salvi started all 10 games at safety and had 98 total tackles, including 39 solo and 59 assisted, 0.5 tackles for loss, eight pass breakups and one fumble recovery. He ranks third in the ODAC in total tackles and tackles per game, and is tied for fourth in pass breakups.

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LIST: Lowcountry tree lightings and holiday parades

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Communities around the Lowcountry are gearing up for the holiday season with tree lightings and parades.Below, you’ll find a list of tree lighting and holiday parade events happening in December.CharlestonThe City of Charleston’s holiday parade will take place on December 4 at 3:00 p.m. The parade will commence on Broad Street at Rutledge Ave.The city will hold its tree lighting in Marion Square following the parade.The Holiday Parade of Boats will take plac...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Communities around the Lowcountry are gearing up for the holiday season with tree lightings and parades.

Below, you’ll find a list of tree lighting and holiday parade events happening in December.

Charleston

The City of Charleston’s holiday parade will take place on December 4 at 3:00 p.m. The parade will commence on Broad Street at Rutledge Ave.

The city will hold its tree lighting in Marion Square following the parade.

The Holiday Parade of Boats will take place on December 10 at Charleston Harbor. This event will happen from 5:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

The City of Charleston and Charleston Park Conservancy will gather at Colonial Lake on December 2 for the annual Light the Lake festival and tree lighting ceremony. The festival runs from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.

>> Learn more about the Light the Lake event: Click here.

Edisto

The 32nd Annual Edisto Christmas Parade will happen on December 10 at 2:00 p.m. The parade will start on Palmetto Blvd.

Folly Beach

The city of Folly Beach will gather to light its community Christmas tree at Folly River Park on November 25 at 7:00 p.m. The city’s 32nd Annual Christmas parade will be on December 10 at noon downtown.

Folly Beach Parks and Recreation will host Santa at Folly River Park on December 9. Children ages 12 and under are invited to meet Santa and shop for free Christmas gifts at the Santa Shack.

Georgetown

A tree lighting and lighted boat parade will happen in Georgetown on December 1. The event begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Georgetown Harborwalk and will run until 9:00 p.m.

Goose Creek

The City of Goose Creek will hold a tree lighting at the Municipal Center on December 2 from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The city’s Christmas parade will be on December 10. The parade will start on St. James Ave at 9:30 a.m.

Hanahan

Hanahan’s holiday parade will happen at 10 a.m. on December 3 and start from Hanahan High School. The tree lighting will be on December 2 at 6 p.m. at the Hanahan Amphitheater.

Moncks Corner

A Christmas tree lighting will happen on December 3 at Moncks Corner Recreation Complex at 6:00 p.m.

The annual Christmas parade will take place along Main Street on December 3 at 6:00 p.m.

The town’s ‘Celebrate the Season Holiday Festival’ will return for its 13th year. The festival will offer visits with Santa, a fire pit and marshmallow roasting, fun rides, and more! It happens December 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, and 17 from 6:00 p.m. until 9 p.m. The festival also features a lights driving tour at Old Santee Canal Park from November 25 through December 30.

Mount Pleasant

The Town of Mount Pleasant will see its annual Christmas Light Parade on December 11 along Coleman Blvd. The parade will begin at 5:30 p.m.

North Charleston

The City of North Charleston will hold its annual Christmas festival and parade on December 3. The event will happen at a new location at the Park Circle Traffic Circle from 4:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The Christmas parade will begin at 5:00 p.m. from Park Place South.

>> Learn more about the city’s holiday events: Click here.

Nexton

The Nexton community will have a golf cart parade on December 9 at 6:30 p.m., followed by a tree lighting at 7:00 p.m.

Summerville

The Town of Summerville and Summerville DREAM will hold a Christmas parade on December 11. The parade will start in Hutchinson Square at 2:00 p.m.

Walterboro

The City of Walterboro will host its community Christmas Parade on December 4 at 6:30 p.m. The parade will start at the Colleton Civic Center in downtown Walterboro.

Did we miss something? Send us information by clicking here.

The Assembly presents Seven Debutantes at 99th Annual Ball

The Assembly, a women’s social club founded in 1923, will present seven young women at its 99th Annual Ball on Saturday, Nov. 19 at The Poinsett Club.Caroline Ramseur Earle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Perry Earle IV, will be presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Perry Earle III of Greenville. She is the great-granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Perry Earle, Junior, and the great-great-granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher Jordan Earle. Her great-great grandmother...

The Assembly, a women’s social club founded in 1923, will present seven young women at its 99th Annual Ball on Saturday, Nov. 19 at The Poinsett Club.

Caroline Ramseur Earle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Perry Earle IV, will be presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Perry Earle III of Greenville. She is the great-granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Perry Earle, Junior, and the great-great-granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher Jordan Earle. Her great-great grandmother, the late Mrs. Fletcher Jordan Earle, was a Charter Member of The Assembly. Miss Earle, a student at Clemson University, will be escorted by Mr. Oliver Perry Earle V of Simpsonville, South Carolina.

Bates Elizabeth Hinsdale, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Eric Hinsdale, will be presented by her mother. She is the great-granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Butler Pearce, Junior, and the great-great granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Bates Smith. Her great-great grandmother, the late Mrs. Eugene Bates Smith, was a Charter Member of The Assembly. Miss Hinsdale, a student at Clemson University, will be escorted by Mr. William Lee Hudson of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.

Hilton Elizabeth McGill, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank McGill, will be presented by her mother, Mrs. Leigh McCall McGill. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. Lenora Clary McCall and the late Arthur C. McCall, Junior. She is the great-granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Croswell McCall and the great-great granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Edgeworth Beattie. Her great-great grandmother, Mrs. William Edgeworth Beattie, was a Charter Member of The Assembly. Miss McGill, a student at College of Charleston, will be escorted by Mr. Connor Matthew Lincks of Charleston, South Carolina.

Sarah Foster McKissick, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Powers McKissick, will be presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. Marion Porter Brawley Rose and the late Mr. Rose, both of Greenville. She is the great-granddaughter of the late Patricia Brawley Rose, and the great-great granddaughter of Mrs. Marion Porter Brawley, Charter Member of The Assembly. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Foster McKissick, II and the great-granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Ellison Smyth McKissick. Her great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Ellison Smyth McKissick, was a Charter Member of The Assembly. Her great-great grandmother, Mrs. Anthony Foster McKissick, and great-great grandmother, Mrs. Ellison Adger Smyth, were both Charter Members of The Assembly. Miss McKissick, a student at Clemson University, will be escorted by Jack Smith Sanford of Greenville, South Carolina.

Elizabeth Earle Talbert, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Pearson Talbert, will be presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Perry Earle III of Greenville, and Mr. and Mrs. Talbert of Valley Grande, Alabama. She is the great-granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Perry Earle, Junior, and the great-great granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher Jordan Earle. Her great-great grandmother, the late Mrs. Fletcher Jordan Earle, was a Charter Member of The Assembly. Miss Talbert, a student at The University of Tennessee, will be escorted by William Furman Jones of Nashville, Tennessee.

Eleanor Louise Usry, daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Lipscomb Richardson and Mr. Charles Matthew Usry, will be presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Henry Richardson, Junior; and Mrs. George Howard Usry and the late Mr. George Howard Usry. She is the great-great granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson Francis Richardson. Her great-great grandmother, Mrs. Jefferson Francis Richardson, was a Charter Member of The Assembly. Miss Usry, a student at the College of Charleston, will be escorted by Mr. William Herbert Kupec of Washington, D.C.

Sarah Elizabeth Usry, daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Lipscomb Richardson and Mr. Charles Matthew Usry, will be presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Henry Richardson, Junior; and Mrs. George Howard Usry and the late Mr. George Howard Usry. She is the great-great granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson Francis Richardson. Her great-great grandmother, Mrs. Jefferson Francis Richardson, was a Charter Member of The Assembly. Miss Usry, a student at the University of South Carolina, will be escorted by Mr. Benjamin Campbell Usry of Charleston, South Carolina.

Family accuses Town of Mount Pleasant of stealing their land

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - A family in Mt. Pleasant is accusing the town of stealing land that has been in their family for more than 100 years, and the entire dispute may hinge upon the way a document was filed 30 years ago.Henry Bailem says John Ballam Road has been in his family since 1893. Bailem and his family have all kinds of plats, legal deeds and documents confirming that they are the rightful owners of John Ballam Estates and John Ballam Road.There was no dispute about it until just a few years ago.In 2017, ...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - A family in Mt. Pleasant is accusing the town of stealing land that has been in their family for more than 100 years, and the entire dispute may hinge upon the way a document was filed 30 years ago.

Henry Bailem says John Ballam Road has been in his family since 1893. Bailem and his family have all kinds of plats, legal deeds and documents confirming that they are the rightful owners of John Ballam Estates and John Ballam Road.

There was no dispute about it until just a few years ago.

In 2017, a developer bought a piece of property across the way, and all of a sudden the road became a public road.

The Town of Mt. Pleasant says the developer has a right to use the road because it’s a public right of way. The town is basing its claim to the road using some of the same public documents.

They reference a plat for John Ballam Estate approved by county council on Oct. 7, 1986. A note on the plat states that the family dedicates the road “for the use of the public forever.” Underneath, it’s signed by Henry Ballam, Rebecca Jefferson, and Estelle Capers.

Estelle Bailem Capers is the oldest member of the Bailem family, and she will be 93 next month. She claims she never signed or intended for her family road to be anything but private.

When asked if she remembers telling the Town of Mount Pleasant that they could have the road, she said “no.”

“No, I wouldn’t give it to them,” she said. “Why would I do that for? And I got nieces and nephew there living on the place.”

Mt. Pleasant acknowledges that three days later Charleston County Council sent a letter to the person who did the survey stating in part that what council actually approved was that the 50 foot right of way would be dedicated to the property owners.

“The first thing you put in your statement was dedicated to the property owners. How do you get over that to get to anything else you’re talking about? Dedicated to property owners was voted on by County Council. That should be the law,” said Diane Jefferson, who is another member of the family.

The wording on the plat was never changed.

Even so, Mt. Pleasant acknowledges that the dirt road was still considered to be a private road, then Hurricane Hugo happened.

“After Hugo there were some trees that fell into the ditch and trees were growing inside of the ditch,” said Henry Bailem IV.

“When you see trees of that size, you know they had to tear this place up to get them out of here and that’s what they did,” Jefferson said.

“We had a dirt road, and they tore the road up,” said Henry Bailem IV. “They said we can’t leave it like this. We have to make it the way it was, or better. So the next thing we knew they started paving the road.”

“Seems like you’re missing a step somewhere in there,” Jefferson said. “Shouldn’t the homeowner have a say so.”

According to Mt. Pleasant’s research, the paving of John Ballam Road improved it, and in their estimation took it from private to public.

Up to this point, they reason it belonged to the county. But in 1995, Mt. Pleasant annexed several roads and property into the town.

John Ballam Road was one of them.

“I believe we could win this case, because I believe we have the necessary documents,” Jefferson said. “I say this again, if you own something, give me the proof where the owners gave it to you. You have one sect of people thinking that they’re more important than another sect of people. And they just think that they can just come and take it. It’s a new generation now. What our forefathers couldn’t do, we’re not in that same situation. And if it takes every dime I got, I’ll fight it.”

The family says they will continue to fight to keep the road in their family.

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