Pressure Washing in North Charleston, SC

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Tidal South has extensive experience in commercial pressure washing, working closely with property managers and contractors for maintenance and new construction projects. Our crew utilizes top-quality commercial equipment, including:

  • Industrial Pressure Washing Trailers
  • High-Output Pressure Washers
  • Integrated Burners for Hot Water
  • Advanced Chemical Solutions
  • Large Water Tanks for Remote Site Pressure Washing

Our commercial clients take their jobs seriously. They have high standards, and as such, we provide the highest-quality, most efficient pressure washing options to exceed those expectations.

If you're a property manager or business owner looking for relief, your property is in good hands with Tidal South Pressure Washing. Some of the most common pressure washing options we offer to commercial customers include:

  • Apartment Pressure Washing
  • Condominium Pressure Washing
  • Parking Garage Pressure Washing
  • Window Cleaning
  • Shopping Center Pressure Washing
  • Retail Store Pressure Washing
  • Fleet Vehicle Pressure Cleaning

What Client Say About Us

Having served apartment complex owners for years, we step in when you need us the most. Some of our apartment and condo pressure washing services include:

Pressure Washing North Charleston, SC

Concrete Cleaning for Apartment Complexes

Our highly-effective pressure washing services for apartments cleans oil, gum, grease, grime, dirt, and just about everything else. We can also pressure wash your community's sidewalks, driveways, parking lots, and much more.

Pressure Washing North Charleston, SC

Building Cleaning for Apartment Complexes

Our washing methods help remove mildew, mold, dirt, and stains in a safe manner for your buildings and tenants. By cleaning the exterior of your apartment building, you can boost curb appeal, maintain siding quality, and protect your tenants' health.

Pressure Washing North Charleston, SC

Roof Cleaning for Apartment Complexes

We use safe washing tactics to clean the roofs in your apartment community. This process protects your shingles and eliminates those ugly black streaks that ruin your shingles.

The Surprising Benefits of Apartment Complex Pressure Washing

Why let your walkways, parking lots, gutters, and siding accrue dirt, grime, mold, and algae? When residents and guests complain about how dirty their apartment community is, you must act quickly. Tidal South Pressure Washing is here to serve you with streamlined, efficient pressure washing services that keep tenants happy.

Here are just a few surprising benefits of apartment complex pressure washing:

Bring in New Tenants
Bring in New Tenants

If you want to attract new residents to your apartment complex, make a great first impression. One of the best ways to do that is with professional pressure washing. As an owner or landlord, you need to show future residents how beautiful their soon-to-be community is. That's true even if you're not charging a lot for rent. Nobody wants to live in a filthy-looking apartment complex.

Reduce Liability
Reduce Liability

As a property manager or landlord, you must abide by your tenant's rights. You have to provide them with a habitable place to live. As such, you must keep your apartment complex clean and free of health hazards like mildew and mold. To avoid liability and litigious action, include pressure washing from Tidal South on your maintenance checklist.

Increase Apartment Building Lifespan
Increase Apartment Building Lifespan

Even the most well-built apartment buildings will suffer from wear and tear with time. Exposure to the elements, especially in areas with a lot of rain and snow, may cause your complex to degrade. When pollutants fester, it accelerates that degradation. By getting rid of those pollutants with pressure washing, you can extend your property's lifespan.

The Surprising Benefits of Apartment Complex Pressure Washing

Though Tidal South Pressure leads the field in commercial pressure washing, we're also proud to offer premium pressure washing for homeowners too.

As one of the premier home power washing companies in metro SC, we're passionate about restoring the outside appearance of homes. We guarantee your satisfaction by using the highest-quality power washing tools and proven techniques to clean your home. Whether you're trying to sell your house or just need to update its look, we're here to help. Give us a call today to learn more about the Tidal South difference.

Some of the most popular residential pressure washing services we offer include:

Pressure Washing North Charleston, SC

Pressure Washing

Pressure Washing North Charleston, SC

Window Cleaning

Pressure Washing North Charleston, SC

House Washing

Pressure Washing North Charleston, SC

Gutter Cleaning

Pressure Washing North Charleston, SC

Concrete Cleaning

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phone-number 843-696-7637
Pressure Washing North Charleston, SC

Benefits of Pressure Washing Your Home

A lot of homeowners believe they can spray down their home with a hose and get the same effects as pressure washing. While DIY cleaning methods are great for minor issues, residential pressure washing is much more comprehensive and effective. It's about more than removing a little dirt from your siding or your gutters.

Here are a few of the most common benefits homeowners enjoy when they use Tidal South for their pressure washing:

Prevent Property Damage

So you've got mold or moss growing on your home's exteriors. What's the big deal? As it turns out, grime, moss, dirt, and other built-up substances can cause corrosion, running your home's exterior surfaces. When left unaddressed, that corrosion can seep into the materials under your concrete sealant or paint, like the wood on your deck. Substances like dirt also tend to accumulate in the small crevices that every home has. Out of reach of the wind and rain, this type of grime can add up for years until it becomes a bacterial breeding ground. Tidal South's residential pressure washing removes dirt, grime, and mold while hitting those impossible-to-reach crevices that damage your home.


Save Money

When you think about all the damage that pressure washing prevents, it makes sense that you'll be saving money when you hire Tidal South. Having your home pressure washed regularly is usually less expensive than the repairs you'll need to pay for if you were to avoid keeping your property clean.


Prep Renovation Surfaces

As you probably know, you can't paint over a dirty surface. If you're thinking about applying a new coat of paint to your home or even adding a deck or new room, pressure wash first. Pressurized washing helps clean your surfaces and can remove peeling paint and other defects that may affect the surface you're working on.

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Trust Tidal South for All of Your Pressure Washing Needs

Keeping your home or business looking its best is a great feeling. But pressure washing goes beyond aesthetics. It protects your property from unnecessary damage, keeps your family or employees happy and safe, and even saves money, time, and stress.

Remember - a thorough pressure wash isn't an extravagance. It's a necessity. Let the friendly professionals at Tidal South Pressure Washing handle the hard work for you. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, whether you're tending to your home or protecting your business.

Have questions about our process? Contact our office today. We'd be happy to answer your questions and explain how we can solve your pressure washing needs.

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Latest News in North Charleston, SC

Editorial: Roper’s move can transform North Charleston, but the details will matter

The long-anticipated news that Roper Hospital has finally locked up the necessary real estate deals to move its main hospital from downtown Charleston to a new campus near North Charleston City Hall triggered the sort of superlatives one expects from any endeavor whose price tag approaches the $1 billion mark: “amazing,” “phenomenal,” “one of the most significant projects across the East Coast,” and “...

The long-anticipated news that Roper Hospital has finally locked up the necessary real estate deals to move its main hospital from downtown Charleston to a new campus near North Charleston City Hall triggered the sort of superlatives one expects from any endeavor whose price tag approaches the $1 billion mark: “amazing,” “phenomenal,” “one of the most significant projects across the East Coast,” and “the center point of our universe called the Lowcountry.”

Indeed, the announcement was reminiscent of Boeing’s transformational decision to build a major manufacturing plant next to the airport. It holds the promise of bringing dramatic changes to the state’s third-largest city, not only by creating a welcoming state-of-the-art medical campus but also by attracting related new office, medical and commercial development to a place that’s centrally located but lacking any special sense of place.

But while the promise is certainly there, both Roper and city officials still must put in the hard work, with public involvement along the way, to ensure that their plans for this area maximize its potential, including from a public perspective, all that it should be.

This could be challenging for several reasons, from the significant, years-long scope of the project to the political uncertainty surrounding next year’s North Charleston mayoral election to the recent, sudden loss of Ray Anderson, Mayor Keith Summey’s trusted lieutenant who oversaw most of the city’s most complicated development challenges.

Fortunately, Roper and the city seem to enjoy an excellent relationship as they begin their work. As Roper CEO Jeffrey DiLisi tells us, “What’s good for Roper at that campus is going to be good for North Charleston, and vice versa.”

Still, there remain important points to work out, and anyone who understands local politics knows full well that what’s best for North Charleston (or any other city, for that matter) can be up for debate.

That’s why we encourage both Roper’s design team and city planners to engage the broader public on issues ranging from new traffic patterns to road improvements to parking plans to complementary public spaces, such as small parks. One of the main advantages of this new campus is that it will be closer to more people in the larger Charleston area. That means many will have an easier time driving there — and parking there, too. But a master plan that emphasizes only automobiles and neglects the pedestrian experience is one that’s bound to disappoint, to miss an important opportunity to turn this into more than just a medical campus: an urban node that will be seen as a desirable place.

Meanwhile, City Council should take a fresh look at the zoning surrounding the medical complex to see if it needs amending in light of Roper’s move — a move that was not foreseen when the city last updated its comprehensive plan. Now is the time for such a review. The longer the city waits, the greater the chance of conflict between it and a developer whose plan — while perfectly legal under current zoning — might clash with the vision for what this part of the city should become. In other words, the city should loop in the public now to see what sort of new development will be most desirable around Roper’s campus and then adjust its plan and zoning accordingly to pave the way.

Yes, Roper’s new presence in North Charleston could create exciting new economic ripple effects, but the city cannot just sit back and expect the private sector to deliver exactly what the city wants. The financing of any related public improvements also deserves close attention, particularly since as exciting as Roper’s move is, it also will remove significant chunks of real property from the city’s tax base.

North Charleston has had mixed success with major redevelopment efforts before, at the former Navy base as well as the old Shipwatch Square shopping center. Of course, neither of its partners in those earlier endeavors had anything resembling the longtime civic presence that Roper St. Francis Healthcare brings to the table, so that alone is reason for hope.

But hope alone is not a plan, and plans often get better when more residents, business owners, civic leaders and others have a say in them.

Roper Hospital Medical Campus coming to North Charleston

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – One of the Lowcountry’s leading hospitals is set to construct a new medical campus in the heart of North Charleston.Roper St. Francis Healthcare announced Wednesday it will invest $1 billion to build a new Roper Hospital Medical Campus at the site of the former North Charleston City Hall off Mall Drive.The campus will occupy 27 acres ne...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – One of the Lowcountry’s leading hospitals is set to construct a new medical campus in the heart of North Charleston.

Roper St. Francis Healthcare announced Wednesday it will invest $1 billion to build a new Roper Hospital Medical Campus at the site of the former North Charleston City Hall off Mall Drive.

The campus will occupy 27 acres near I-26 and I-526 which leaders say will make the hospital and its services easily accessible for patients who live in Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester counties.

Roper announced in November 2021 that it planned to move off the Charleston peninsula, a move they said would allow patients to “easily access care closer to where they live and work.”

North Charleston’s Finance Committee voted in favor of selling the former city hall building to Roper Hospital on Tuesday evening. City Council then approved the sale in a brief meeting afterward.

“It was a deal we are all proud of. The hospital is something we need. It’s going to bring thousands of jobs. They’re moving the whole campus to North Charleston and that’s a good thing,” said Mayor Pro Tem and City Councilman Jerome Heyward.

“This new medical campus will be a paradigm for providing healthcare, whether that’s complex surgeries in a hospital or an annual checkup in an outpatient office,” said Dr. Jeffrey DiLisi, president and chief executive officer of Roper St. Francis Healthcare. “We made the bold decision one year ago to move Roper Hospital, and I’m grateful to our North Charleston partners for breathing life into this dream. This new campus will ensure our ability to continue delivering the quality care that’s been the hallmark of our brand for generations.”

Roper’s leaders say the new medical campus is expected to include a full-service acute care hospital with a 24-hour Emergency Room. It will also have a medical office building where myriad outpatient and specialty care will be offered.

“We welcome Roper St. Francis Healthcare to the North Charleston hub of economic development,” said North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey. “The new Roper Hospital Medical Campus is the next exciting chapter of this healthcare system’s 167-year legacy, and I am honored that the third largest city in South Carolina can host this tremendous benefit for our citizens.”

The new campus will be the fourth location for Roper Hospital since it opened downtown in 1856. Leaders say it will be technologically and structurally upgraded to better withstand natural disasters, such as floods, hurricanes and earthquakes.

Construction is likely to take up to five years. Important services will continue to be offered on the peninsula to “remain convenient to those in need downtown.”

Joint Base Charleston to present 36 Distinguished Flying Crosses to airmen

Three dozen airmen are set to receive the U.S. Air Force’s highest award for heroism while participating in aerial flight at a Monday morning ceremony.NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Three dozen airmen are set to receive the U.S. Air Force’s highest award for heroism while participating in aerial flight at a Monday morning ceremony.U.S. Air Force Gen. Mike Minihan will present the award to 51 men and women, the highest number ever presented at a single ceremony in decades.Col. David Taylor, the Vice Commander...

Three dozen airmen are set to receive the U.S. Air Force’s highest award for heroism while participating in aerial flight at a Monday morning ceremony.

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Three dozen airmen are set to receive the U.S. Air Force’s highest award for heroism while participating in aerial flight at a Monday morning ceremony.

U.S. Air Force Gen. Mike Minihan will present the award to 51 men and women, the highest number ever presented at a single ceremony in decades.

Col. David Taylor, the Vice Commander of the 437th Airlift Wing, said the pilots are being recognized for their actions during Operation Allies Refuge, which was the evacuation of Afghanistan in August 2021, and the largest non-combatant evacuation operation in American history. He said there are so many recipients because of the number of missions the aircrews completed while evacuating Afghanistan.

For example, during one of the missions, a reserve crew had over 800 refugees on board, and during the flight, a baby was delivered on board, he said. Also, he said five of the crews were the very last C-17s to depart Afghanistan, experiencing extremely risky flying.

It’s not only pilots being awarded at Monday’s ceremony. Taylor said aircraft maintainers and loadmasters will also receive the honor for their bravery.

“We’re extremely proud of our airmen. This is a group of reservists and active-duty airmen that really went above and beyond what our nation asked them to do,” Taylor said. “And it is because of their expertise that allowed this mission to be successful. And I’m looking forward to pinning those metals are their chest.”

Among the group of recipients is Capt. Rhea McFarland, a pilot and training officer who will be the first African American female to receive a Distinguished Flying Cross. During Operations Allies Refuge, McFarland ensured a successful evacuation of refugees and as one of the last aircraft to depart Kabul, supported the withdrawal of military personnel, the base said.

Taylor said they flew the recipients into Charleston, where they were stationed at the time of the mission, to receive their awards.

Base officials said they will be posting updates of the ceremony online on social media including the Joint Base Charleston Facebook page.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Businesses soon to be displaced as North Charleston redevelops former Navy base

NORTH CHARLESTON — Elizabeth and Chris Fisher moved their glass recycling company into an old warehouse on the former Charleston Naval Base around 2006. They were expecting to be an integral part in the city’s plan for transforming the old military complex into a vibrant, mixed-use community along the Cooper River.“We were going to be the place where Noisette people were going to bring their recycling,” said Elizabeth Fisher, referring to North Charleston’s massive Noisette master plan that sought to rede...

NORTH CHARLESTON — Elizabeth and Chris Fisher moved their glass recycling company into an old warehouse on the former Charleston Naval Base around 2006. They were expecting to be an integral part in the city’s plan for transforming the old military complex into a vibrant, mixed-use community along the Cooper River.

“We were going to be the place where Noisette people were going to bring their recycling,” said Elizabeth Fisher, referring to North Charleston’s massive Noisette master plan that sought to redevelop several hundred acres across the base. That plan, announced two decades ago, ended in foreclosure.

Now, more than 15 years since its arrival, Fisher Recycling is having to find a new home.

North Charleston is preparing to demolish the city-owned, 84,000-square-foot warehouse at 2750 Avenue B, home to Fisher and a handful of artisans and locally owned businesses, as part of a plan to transform the northern end of the base.

The Fishers, who relocated years ago from Mount Pleasant to Park Circle, have grown attached to the community, Elizabeth Fisher said. Additionally, the area is conveniently located near the bustling Interstate 526. The couple believes the city’s redevelopment plans will be a positive change for the community. They also acknowledged that the municipality has worked to help the recycling business find a new place to do business.

The couple just wishes they could stay in the neighborhood to be part of the upcoming change.

“It definitely is for the better for the city from a revenue standpoint,” Elizabeth Fisher said. “But I won’t sugarcoat it. I’d rather stay here.”

Fisher Recycling and several other locally owned businesses, including a bike shop, beverage and snack distributor, furniture maker and a carpenter, must vacate the warehouse by the end of January.

Locating a new space to do business has been challenging, particularly for those who want to remain in North Charleston, where rent and property values are becoming more expensive.

Property costs have risen dramatically over the past decade in the city’s Park Circle area, now a booming enclave of new apartments, restaurants, recreational spaces and single-family houses.

Additionally, industrial properties are becoming increasingly rare in North Charleston, long a haven for the manufacturing industry.

Near the former Navy complex the city is considering rezoning a handful of industrial parcels to general business, a decision that was met with opposition from several of the properties’ owners during the Oct. 10 Planning Commission meeting.

Chris Fisher said he plans to ask city officials at a committee meeting next month to allow one of the lots along Rivers Avenue to remain industrial so that the recycling business could use the site as its new home.

The city’s plans for the old base aren’t a surprise. Occupants on the northern end have known for years of the city’s intentions to revitalize that section of the complex.

Some companies have already moved. Others have remained, with some hoping that the Navy base redevelopment plans would continue to stall as they had for more than a decade.

But reality began to settle in last year when construction crews began installing the new, winding pedestrian bridge at Noisette Creek.

Businesses in the warehouse then received letters in June informing them of a Dec. 31 deadline, and that the city would not charge them rent for the remainder of the year, said city spokesman Ryan Johnson. The December deadline has since been extended to the end of January.

“It’s been no secret that the redevelopment was going to happen,” Johnson said.

The occupied warehouse sits beside an abandoned storage space that will also be demolished. Both are located at the foot of the bridge.

The city’s vision calls for the transformation of about 90 acres at the foot of the bridge to include a fishing pier along Noisette Creek, condos, restaurants, green space and possibly a water taxi. About 60 of those acres are owned by the city, while the rest is currently occupied by the federal government, a nonprofit and a brewery.

Charleston County approves $7.3M for green spaces and new parks

The latest round of Charleston County greenbelt purchases includes millions for a 440-acre park-and-trail system in North Charleston and an expansion of the Botany Bay Heritage Preserve and Wildlife Management Area near Edisto Beach.Funded by the voter-approved half-percent sales tax, which is primarily dedicated to road construction projects, the greenbelt program protects land from development by purchasing it outright or by buying the rights to prevent development on privately owned land.The county agreed to spend more than ...

The latest round of Charleston County greenbelt purchases includes millions for a 440-acre park-and-trail system in North Charleston and an expansion of the Botany Bay Heritage Preserve and Wildlife Management Area near Edisto Beach.

Funded by the voter-approved half-percent sales tax, which is primarily dedicated to road construction projects, the greenbelt program protects land from development by purchasing it outright or by buying the rights to prevent development on privately owned land.

The county agreed to spend more than $7.3 million on a half-dozen greenbelt projects, with just one accounting for more than half the money.

More than $4 million will help North Charleston fund a $12 million project involving 440 acres of land, 240 acres of which are wetlands. The land would be used to create a park-and-trail system between Interstate 26, Palmetto Commerce Parkway, S.C. Highway 78 and Ashley Phosphate Road.

The county funding includes $1 million for improvements such as trails. Landowners Weber USA Corp., Lilienthal Strasse Associates and DD Ingleside II LLC are contributing $3 million of the $12 million land value.

“Passive use of the property will include foot traffic from access points off public roads with sidewalks like Ingleside Boulevard,” said Ryan Johnson, in North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey’s office. “Multi-family housing and mixed-use developments are being built all throughout this region which will bring new residents looking for daily walking opportunities.”

“The tract also includes native forest habitats that provide opportunity for solitude and remoteness,” he said. “Recreational opportunities extending down the 1.5 miles of forested floodplain to Blue House Canal for wildlife photography, particularly birds, plants, wildflowers, and amphibians. Existing trails on the property provide a way for communities to connect with the forest and with history.”

The proposed Ingleside-Weber Park is expected to be open year-round, dawn to dusk. It runs through a former 2,000-acre rice plantation that the city has worked aggressively to see developed with construction of Palmetto Commerce Parkway, a proposed Interstate 26 interchange and tax incentives.

“That’s some of the most desirable land in the Charleston area,” said county greenbelt program Director Eric Davis. “The plan is to connect that eventually all the way over to Wannamaker Park behind Charleston Southern University.”

The second-largest project is not actually a new one but instead reimburses the Open Space Institute Land Trust for the nonprofit’s purchase early this year of nearly 180 acres on Edisto Island, 53 of which are wetlands adjacent to Botany Bay Heritage Preserve and Wildlife Management Area.

As The Post and Courier reported in April, the Open Space Institute purchased the property known as Bayview Farms that month for $3.2 million. The purchase price was covered with a loan from the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, and a donation from former Gov. Mark Sanford covered other purchase-related costs.

According to the county, the land on Botany Bay Road will be donated to the S.C. Department of Natural Resources and incorporated into the preserve, which is open to the public and free to visit.

The remaining greenbelt deals approved by the county are:

Going forward, the greenbelt program has $18.6 million remaining for the budget year that will end June 30, 2023. The second and final round of applications for funding for this fiscal year will close in January.

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