Pressure Washing in Sullivan's Island, SC

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Tidal South has extensive experience in commercial pressure washing, working closely with property managers and contractors for maintenance and new construction projects. Our crew utilizes top-quality commercial equipment, including:

  • Industrial Pressure Washing Trailers
  • High-Output Pressure Washers
  • Integrated Burners for Hot Water
  • Advanced Chemical Solutions
  • Large Water Tanks for Remote Site Pressure Washing

Our commercial clients take their jobs seriously. They have high standards, and as such, we provide the highest-quality, most efficient pressure washing options to exceed those expectations.

If you're a property manager or business owner looking for relief, your property is in good hands with Tidal South Pressure Washing. Some of the most common pressure washing options we offer to commercial customers include:

  • Apartment Pressure Washing
  • Condominium Pressure Washing
  • Parking Garage Pressure Washing
  • Window Cleaning
  • Shopping Center Pressure Washing
  • Retail Store Pressure Washing
  • Fleet Vehicle Pressure Cleaning

What Client Say About Us

Having served apartment complex owners for years, we step in when you need us the most. Some of our apartment and condo pressure washing services include:

Pressure Washing Sullivan's Island, SC

Concrete Cleaning for Apartment Complexes

Our highly-effective pressure washing services for apartments cleans oil, gum, grease, grime, dirt, and just about everything else. We can also pressure wash your community's sidewalks, driveways, parking lots, and much more.

Pressure Washing Sullivan's Island, SC

Building Cleaning for Apartment Complexes

Our washing methods help remove mildew, mold, dirt, and stains in a safe manner for your buildings and tenants. By cleaning the exterior of your apartment building, you can boost curb appeal, maintain siding quality, and protect your tenants' health.

Pressure Washing Sullivan's Island, SC

Roof Cleaning for Apartment Complexes

We use safe washing tactics to clean the roofs in your apartment community. This process protects your shingles and eliminates those ugly black streaks that ruin your shingles.

The Surprising Benefits of Apartment Complex Pressure Washing

Why let your walkways, parking lots, gutters, and siding accrue dirt, grime, mold, and algae? When residents and guests complain about how dirty their apartment community is, you must act quickly. Tidal South Pressure Washing is here to serve you with streamlined, efficient pressure washing services that keep tenants happy.

Here are just a few surprising benefits of apartment complex pressure washing:

Bring in New Tenants
Bring in New Tenants

If you want to attract new residents to your apartment complex, make a great first impression. One of the best ways to do that is with professional pressure washing. As an owner or landlord, you need to show future residents how beautiful their soon-to-be community is. That's true even if you're not charging a lot for rent. Nobody wants to live in a filthy-looking apartment complex.

Reduce Liability
Reduce Liability

As a property manager or landlord, you must abide by your tenant's rights. You have to provide them with a habitable place to live. As such, you must keep your apartment complex clean and free of health hazards like mildew and mold. To avoid liability and litigious action, include pressure washing from Tidal South on your maintenance checklist.

Increase Apartment Building Lifespan
Increase Apartment Building Lifespan

Even the most well-built apartment buildings will suffer from wear and tear with time. Exposure to the elements, especially in areas with a lot of rain and snow, may cause your complex to degrade. When pollutants fester, it accelerates that degradation. By getting rid of those pollutants with pressure washing, you can extend your property's lifespan.

The Surprising Benefits of Apartment Complex Pressure Washing

Though Tidal South Pressure leads the field in commercial pressure washing, we're also proud to offer premium pressure washing for homeowners too.

As one of the premier home power washing companies in metro SC, we're passionate about restoring the outside appearance of homes. We guarantee your satisfaction by using the highest-quality power washing tools and proven techniques to clean your home. Whether you're trying to sell your house or just need to update its look, we're here to help. Give us a call today to learn more about the Tidal South difference.

Some of the most popular residential pressure washing services we offer include:

Pressure Washing Sullivan's Island, SC

Pressure Washing

Pressure Washing Sullivan's Island, SC

Window Cleaning

Pressure Washing Sullivan's Island, SC

House Washing

Pressure Washing Sullivan's Island, SC

Gutter Cleaning

Pressure Washing Sullivan's Island, SC

Concrete Cleaning

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phone-number 843-696-7637
Pressure Washing Sullivan's Island, SC

Benefits of Pressure Washing Your Home

A lot of homeowners believe they can spray down their home with a hose and get the same effects as pressure washing. While DIY cleaning methods are great for minor issues, residential pressure washing is much more comprehensive and effective. It's about more than removing a little dirt from your siding or your gutters.

Here are a few of the most common benefits homeowners enjoy when they use Tidal South for their pressure washing:

Prevent Property Damage

So you've got mold or moss growing on your home's exteriors. What's the big deal? As it turns out, grime, moss, dirt, and other built-up substances can cause corrosion, running your home's exterior surfaces. When left unaddressed, that corrosion can seep into the materials under your concrete sealant or paint, like the wood on your deck. Substances like dirt also tend to accumulate in the small crevices that every home has. Out of reach of the wind and rain, this type of grime can add up for years until it becomes a bacterial breeding ground. Tidal South's residential pressure washing removes dirt, grime, and mold while hitting those impossible-to-reach crevices that damage your home.


Save Money

When you think about all the damage that pressure washing prevents, it makes sense that you'll be saving money when you hire Tidal South. Having your home pressure washed regularly is usually less expensive than the repairs you'll need to pay for if you were to avoid keeping your property clean.


Prep Renovation Surfaces

As you probably know, you can't paint over a dirty surface. If you're thinking about applying a new coat of paint to your home or even adding a deck or new room, pressure wash first. Pressurized washing helps clean your surfaces and can remove peeling paint and other defects that may affect the surface you're working on.

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Trust Tidal South for All of Your Pressure Washing Needs

Keeping your home or business looking its best is a great feeling. But pressure washing goes beyond aesthetics. It protects your property from unnecessary damage, keeps your family or employees happy and safe, and even saves money, time, and stress.

Remember - a thorough pressure wash isn't an extravagance. It's a necessity. Let the friendly professionals at Tidal South Pressure Washing handle the hard work for you. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, whether you're tending to your home or protecting your business.

Have questions about our process? Contact our office today. We'd be happy to answer your questions and explain how we can solve your pressure washing needs.

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

SC finishes sea turtle nesting season with record-breaking inventory

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are ...

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.

Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.

Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.

For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.

As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are optimistic the reptiles are beginning to recover.

“Increased nest counts since the mid- to late-2000s show promise for the loggerhead,” said Michelle Pate, nesting program leader for DNR. “We’re seeing the continued benefits of conservation measured enacted decades ago as well as those management techniques still used today.”

Among the most interesting finds this season was the oddity of a leucistic sea turtle on Folly Beach. While most loggerhead turtles are dark, leucistic animals are white, pale or patchy in color because of their reduced pigmentation.

Dave Miller, the permit holder for the Folly Beach Turtle Team, found the special turtle in September.

“I saw these two turtles coming out of the nest and they were covered with sand,” Miller said. “And then the wave washed them over and one of them was white. I didn’t realize it when it was covered in sand.”

Leucism increases animals’ chances of being taken by predators. And in areas like Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island, coyotes are among the top predators for sea turtles.

Turtle patrol volunteers work to find sea turtle nests on beaches before coyotes do.

“What the Wild Dunes coyotes have learned to do is ambush the turtle as she comes out of the water in the middle of the night and begins to lay her eggs,” said Mary Pringle, a project leader for the Island Turtle Team in Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island.

The coyotes will often eat the turtle’s eggs before volunteers can get to them in the morning and place plastic screens over the nests. The animals can’t destroy the nests once that happens. But volunteers can’t predict when and where a turtle will choose to nest.

“When I started (volunteering), we didn’t have any coyotes,” Pringle said. “We had raccoons and ghost crabs as predators, but not coyotes. And it’s just something that’s happening all over the coast.”

Foxes and the emergence of armadillos on beaches have also become a reason for nest losses in the state.

Pate said other concerns include artificial lighting on heavily populated beaches, and people intercepting nesting females at night.

Even with predators like coyotes, sea turtle species in the state have found a way to prevail. Many new turtles nested here for the first time this season.

“And they (scientists) are cautiously optimistic that it will continue because of nest protection efforts — saving nests, making sure they hatch like we did and all the other people who do the same thing that we do for DNR,” Pringle said.

Pringle’s Island Turtle Team is one of about 30 groups along the coast that patrol beaches from May 1 to Oct. 31 to count, monitor and protect the nests. DNR said there are more than 1,500 volunteers coastwide.

Fifty-seven total nests were spotted this year on the Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island. And 4,602 turtles hatched on those islands.

Most of the nests there were in the Wild Dunes area.

Thirty-four nests were were counted on Myrtle Beach; 99 on Folly Beach; 483 on Kiawah Island; 351 at Edisto Beach State Park; and 423 on Hilton Head Island, according to data.

Loggerheads nest on the state’s shores more often than any other species, but greens, Kemp’s ridleys and leatherbacks also have a presence here.

Each species is classified as endangered or threatened and receive protections under the Endangered Species Acts. Extra state protections are also in place.

This year, 7,974 nests were counted in the state, 21 green turtle nests and one Kemp’s ridley nest.

Green turtles and Kemp’s ridleys are primarily found in other regions of North America, including Florida and the western Gulf of Mexico.

“I think in the history of Folly Beach Turtle Team, we’ve had maybe two leatherbacks,” Miller said. “And everything else has been loggerheads.”

Other species will pop up on the beach, maybe for food, but choose to nest in other locations.

DNR said beachgoers can help the state’s sea turtles by keeping beaches clean, giving the animals and their nests space and turning beachfront lights out to avoid disorienting them during nesting season.

10 South Carolina Beaches Worth Visiting In The Winter (Over Summer)

South Carolina is known for its miles of spectacular coastline and parade of beach town destinations that are perfect for summer getaways. However, once the temperatures drop and the hordes of summer crowds depart, these beautiful beaches transform into off-season retreats that still offer intrepid travelers plenty to see, do, and experience. The following are some of SC’s absolute best beaches for the ultimate idyllic winte...

South Carolina is known for its miles of spectacular coastline and parade of beach town destinations that are perfect for summer getaways. However, once the temperatures drop and the hordes of summer crowds depart, these beautiful beaches transform into off-season retreats that still offer intrepid travelers plenty to see, do, and experience. The following are some of SC’s absolute best beaches for the ultimate idyllic winter vacation full of sun, sand, and off-season adventure.

Hilton Head

Known as “America’s Favorite Island,” Hilton Head is so much more than one of South Carolina’s most visited summer beach towns; it’s also a lovely escape in the off-season for those looking for year-round beachy vibes. And with an average daytime temperature in the low-to-mid 60s, the weather is just balmy enough to still enjoy (most) of HH’s most popular outdoor activities—without the summer crowds.

Folly Beach

The popular Folly Beach is just minutes from downtown Charleston, making it an ideal spot to take a winter break. Temperatures in the 60s throughout make for cooler days that are still perfect for Low Country exploring, while nearby Charleston has a number of fun winter activities that are just a stone’s throw away from Folly Beach’s laidback vibes and picturesque beauty.

Myrtle Beach

Myrtle Beach is undoubtedly one of South Carolina’s top-rated beaches throughout the summer—but in the off-season, the beautiful beach town is still a bustling hub of activities and events that make it a wow-worthy winter destination, too. And while it may be too cool to take a dip, MB’s outdoor scenery is just as lovely as it is in the summer.

Kiawah Island

Kiawah Island is a secluded beach town escape whose year-round laidback vibes make it the perfect place to visit in winter’s cooler months. Undoubtedly, one of the best reasons to visit Kiawah is its relaxing atmosphere—made even better by the lack of summer crowds—but there are still plenty of outdoor activities and recreation on tap for outdoor enthusiasts, too.

Isle Of Palms

Isle of Palms may be known for its stellar summer recreation; however, this Charleston area beach is so much more than a warm weather retreat. Throughout the off-season, this picturesque SC beach’s tranquil (and mostly crowd-free!) vibes become the perfect getaway for those looking for a beachfront vacay with plenty to see and do during the cool(er) winter months.

Sullivan’s Island

A neighbor to Isle of Palms located at the mouth of the lovely Charleston harbor, Sullivan’s Island is the perfect mix of small-town charm and relaxing, beachside fun. Home to beautiful beaches, outdoor adventures, and nearby activities galore, Sullivan’s Island is the perfect winter getaway.

Pawley’s Island

Known as one of America’s oldest and best summer resort communities, Pawley’s Island may seem like an exclusively warm weather destination. However, when the summer crowds leave, there are still plenty of things to see and do in this historic SC beach town.

Murrells Inlet

A popular fishing village near Myrtle Beach, Murrells Inlet is packed with charm, history, and wonderful waterfront scenery that make it a gorgeous year-round getaway. From pirate lore to oodles of outdoor recreation, SC’s “seafood capital” is a fun-filled winter retreat.

Litchfield Beach

Well known for its pristine white sand and turquoise waters that make for an idyllic summer retreat, Litchfield Beach is no less beautiful during the cool(er) winter months. Come for the activities like fishing and biking, but stay for the relaxing, scenic vibes available year-round.

Surfside Beach

Located near Myrtle Beach, the spectacularly scenic Surfside Beach is known as a popular family-friendly destination throughout the summer. However, there’s plenty to do here during the off-season, too, for those looking to escape the warm weather crowds.

Men's lacrosse announces 2023 signing class

RICHMOND, Va. – Richmond men's lacrosse announced the members of its 2023 signing class Wednesday, one week after prospective student-athletes enrolling in college in 2023 were first eligible to sign a National Letter of Intent.Twelve players signed a National Letter of Intent to attend Richmond and compete for the Spiders as freshmen in 2023-24. The group is comprised of five players from New York – including three players from Long Island – two players from Ontario, and one each from Georgia, Mass...

RICHMOND, Va. – Richmond men's lacrosse announced the members of its 2023 signing class Wednesday, one week after prospective student-athletes enrolling in college in 2023 were first eligible to sign a National Letter of Intent.

Twelve players signed a National Letter of Intent to attend Richmond and compete for the Spiders as freshmen in 2023-24. The group is comprised of five players from New York – including three players from Long Island – two players from Ontario, and one each from Georgia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia.

"The 12 young men that just signed their NLIs are an accomplished group," said Spiders head coach Dan Chemotti. "They are stellar students, from lacrosse hotbeds and non-traditional areas, including Canada, and they have excelled in a variety of sports. Above all else, they are phenomenal people with great character who have what it takes to continue the championship culture we've established over the last 10 years. The level of talent in this class is a credit to the hard work by our assistant coaches and the fact that the University of Richmond is, without question, the full package."

Richmond is one of the nation's most successful men's lacrosse programs, having reached the NCAA Tournament in four of the last eight seasons. The Spiders, 2022 Southern Conference champions, have played in eight straight conference championship games, the longest active streak in Division I. In May, the program announced it would move to the Atlantic 10 in 2023 to compete in the inaugural season of A-10 men's lacrosse. UR will be joined by High Point, Hobart, Massachusetts, Saint Joseph's, and St. Bonaventure in the league.

Names, positions, high schools, and hometowns for Richmond's 2023 signing class are below.

NAME (POSITION) - HIGH SCHOOL (HOMETOWN) Gavin Creo (Attack) - Chaminade (Rockville Centre, NY) Michael Fagen (Midfield) - Lynbrook (Lynbrook, NY) Lucas Littlejohn (Attack/Midfield) - Holy Trinity (Courtice, Ontario) Luke Meyer (Attack/Midfield) - Port Washington (Port Washington, NY) Nate Murphy (Defense) - Paul VI (Chantilly, VA) Charlie Packard (Midfield) - Hingham (Hingham, MA) Brayden Penafeather-Stevenson (Defense) - Baldwinsville (Baldwinsville, NY) Sean Siegel (Defense) - Byram Hills (Pleasantville, NY) Lucas Slate (Attack/Midfield) - Episcopal (Downingtown, PA) Tye Steenhuis (Midfield) - Hill Academy (St. Catharines, Ontario) Jackson Strickland (Face Off) - Calvert Hall (Sullivan's Island, SC) Aidan Wooley (Midfield) - Westminster (Atlanta, GA)

South Carolina Department Of Transportation Stops, Restarts Work On Isle Of Palms Connector Restriping Options

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye NewsThe South Carolina Department of Transportation stopped working on a study that will provide options to restripe the Isle of Palms Connector in late October, apparently in response to a lawsuit filed by an organization founded by a former IOP mayor and a current Council member.According to IOP City Administrator Desiree Fragoso, she was informed by the SCDOT the evening of Oct. 31 “that they may be pausing the study.” Four days later, on Nov. 4, Fragoso got the word that SCDOT...

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News

The South Carolina Department of Transportation stopped working on a study that will provide options to restripe the Isle of Palms Connector in late October, apparently in response to a lawsuit filed by an organization founded by a former IOP mayor and a current Council member.

According to IOP City Administrator Desiree Fragoso, she was informed by the SCDOT the evening of Oct. 31 “that they may be pausing the study.” Four days later, on Nov. 4, Fragoso got the word that SCDOT was moving forward with plans to present its findings to the IOP Council, either on Nov. 15 or Dec. 6, Fragoso said.

“We paused our work in order to let the attorneys review the situation,” Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall said in a Nov. 7 email. “Following their review, we resumed work a few days later. The pause had no significant impact. We are still on track to meet with IOP city officials prior to the end of the calendar year.” Mayor Phillip Pounds said the city did not negotiate with the state agency during the week the study was paused but instead “leveraged our relationships SCDOT and State Sen. (Chip) Campsen to get this thing back on track.” Pounds said SCDOT probably would present eight to 10 options for the Connector bridge at the city Council’s Dec. 6 meeting. The next step is “still to be determined.” Pounds noted that the Council, the Public Safety Committee – headed by Jan Anderson – and the general public might all play a role in paring the options down to a workable number. Without any input from the city of Isle of Palms, SCDOT re-striped the bridge in March 2021, adding two bike lanes and two pedestrian lanes and shrinking the center emergency lane from 10 feet to 4 feet. A year later, former Mayor Jimmy Carroll and sitting Council Member Blair Hahn formed The Palm Republic, a privately funded organization that has questioned the constitutionality of S.40, a law passed in 2021 which grants SCDOT the authority to determine where visitors to IOP, Sullivan’s Island, Edisto and Folly Beach can park on state roads and how much, if anything, these municipalities can charge them. The Palm Republic recently filed a petition and complaint with the South Carolina Supreme Court in an effort to force SCDOT to treat these four communities as it treats the state’s other municipalities. The lawsuit also claims that SCDOT violated the Constitution by restriping the bridge without input from the city. Hahn was not happy with what appeared to be SCDOT’s reaction to The Palm Republic’s lawsuit. “Every citizen has a right to challenge the constitutionality of any statute,” Hahn said. “If a government entity threatens to withhold government services because a citizen is challenging the constitutionality of a statute, that government entity should be held accountable because that’s illegal.” “SCDOT didn’t do a single engineering study or engineering report when they re-striped the bridge. They did nothing except follow the direction of those on high,” Hahn added. Fragoso, meanwhile, said the city would work with SCDOT to find ways to make the configuration of the Connector bridge more palatable to the Council and the community.

“We continue to work collaboratively with DOT in solving issues in our community that need addressing, and we’re eager to see the final report on the IOP Connector, evaluate the options presented and discuss the best path for that project,” Fragoso said.

Message From The Mayor: November 2022

Happy Thanksgiving. We have much to be thankful for in this great country we get to live in and for the piece of paradise we get to call home. I hope you can spend some time with family and friends and take a moment to reflect on all the things we have to be thankful for.Here are nine fun facts about Thanksgiving to share around the dinner table.• The first Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621 over a three day harvest festival. It included 50 Pilgrims, 90 Wampanoag Indians, and lasted three days.• Turkey wasn&rs...

Happy Thanksgiving. We have much to be thankful for in this great country we get to live in and for the piece of paradise we get to call home. I hope you can spend some time with family and friends and take a moment to reflect on all the things we have to be thankful for.

Here are nine fun facts about Thanksgiving to share around the dinner table.

• The first Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621 over a three day harvest festival. It included 50 Pilgrims, 90 Wampanoag Indians, and lasted three days.

• Turkey wasn’t on the menu at the first Thanksgiving. Venison, duck, goose, oysters, lobster, eel, and fish were likely served, alongside pumpkins and cranberries.

• Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving a national holiday on Oct. 3, 1863. Sarah Josepha Hale, the woman who wrote “Mary Had A Little Lamb,” convinced Lincoln to make Thanksgiving a national holiday after writing letters for 17 years.

• The history of U.S. presidents pardoning turkeys is patchy. Harry Truman is often credited with being the first president to pardon a turkey, but that’s not quite true. He was the first to receive a ceremonial turkey from the National Turkey Federation – and he had it for dinner. John F. Kennedy was the first to let a Thanksgiving turkey go, followed by Richard Nixon who sent his turkey to a petting zoo. George H.W. Bush is the president who formalized the turkey pardoning tradition in 1989.

• There are four towns in the United States named “Turkey.” They can be found in Arizona, Texas, Louisiana and North Carolina.

• The average number of calories consumed on Thanksgiving is 4,500.

• Butterball answers more than 100,000 turkey cooking questions via their Butterball Turkey Hotline each November and December.

• The tradition of football on Thanksgiving began in 1876 with a game between Yale and Princeton. The first NFL games were played on Thanksgiving in 1920.

• More than 54 million Americans are expected to travel during the Thanksgiving holiday this year

WHAT’S THE LATEST?

As I mentioned in an earlier message, we recently held a beach traffic debrief session with several of our partners – SCDOT, Mount Pleasant, Sullivan’s Island, Folly Beach, County Parks and Channel 4. The goal of this meeting was to recap all the pre-season joint efforts and discuss what worked well and what didn’t and what could be improved upon for next season.

Mayors, city administrators, police chiefs and senior directors were in attendance. There were a number of takeaways for next year – like starting the social media campaign earlier for the spring break crowds. One of the more effective efforts this past season was the Channel 4 Beach Information Station: Know Before you Go campaign. The goal was to raise awareness about all things related to beach travel and safety.

ABC News 4, Trooper Bob along with mayors and Explore Charleston partnered to produce a series of news stories and messages promoting beach information needed to plan a visit. For Folly Beach, IOP and Sullivan’s Island, it detailed weather, radar, tides, parking information, parking, beach and pet rules, dynamic traffic maps, traffic cameras, CARTA beach shuttle information and Charleston County Park information for IOP and Folly Beach. Between promotional messages, news messages, and social media posts there were over 11.5 million impressions by local viewers and visitors. A very successful joint effort in trying to reach those visiting our beaches. We’ve had some lively meetings and public hearings lately with great attendance by our residents. One thing I’m thankful for is the engagement and passion focused on making our island better.

As we all continue to engage and discuss important topics, let’s lead the way in maintaining civility in our dialogues.

The Municipal Association of South Carolina recently created the Pillars of Civility which include:

• Be as eager to listen as to speak.

• Concentrate on what you have in common, not what separates you.

• Your time is valuable. So is everyone else’s. Respect it.

• Act as you would expect someone to act in your home.

• Ask questions to learn. Answer questions with respect.

• Concentrate on facts, not theories.

• Ask “what will persuade people in this room?” not “what will make a great tweet?”

• Make your case on merits, not on what people want to hear.

• Make your point about the issue, not the person.

I might add one to this list: Work to build each other up, not tear each other down. We are all facing whatever life throws our way. Bringing some empathy to the table as a default setting is a great way to approach each other. You can find information for project updates and upcoming meetings on the IOP website at IOP.net.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Nov. 25 – No Coffee with the Mayor this month due to the holiday. Next one is set for Dec. 30 at the Rec Center at 9 a.m.

Dec. 3 – Holiday Street Festival – 2-7 p.m. at FrontBeach. Arts and crafts, food vendors, children’s activities, and live entertainment.

Dec. 8 – Coffee with the Chief – 9-10 a.m. Join Fire Chief Oliverius at Station 1, Public Safety Building Training Room at 30 J C Long Blvd.

Dec. 20 – Santa’s Cookie Workshop – 2 p.m. at the Rec Center.

Thank you for the opportunity to serve. See you around the island.

Phillip Pounds, Mayor

843-252-5359

[email protected]

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